Wrong About Everything Podcast | A Fun, Bi-Partisan Look at Minnesota Politics

Mar
11
When: 
Mar 11, 2020
4:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Where: 
Edina Country Club
5100 Wooddale Ave
Edina, MN 55424

Wrong About Everything is a weekly podcast bringing an irreverent and bipartisan look at Minnesota and national politics. Two Liberals and Two Conservatives debate the issues of the day with humor and vigor. Sometimes we work blue, sometimes red! 

Listen to their podcasts here or anywhere you get your podcasts.

SCHEDULE:

4 PM | Appetizers, Networking and Registration
5 PM | Program and Q & A
6 PM | Informal Networking

ATTIRE:

We want to match what companies in the marketplace are doing. For all events we are moving to a "Dress For the Day" approach. This means come dressed as you do for work, which for many is business casual, expressing your individually. Feel free to leave your coat and tie in the car!

BIOS:

Amy Koch is a small business owner, a political strategist and a regular commentator on Minnesota local media. She is frequently quoted on WCCO, MPR, the Star Tribune, the Pioneer Press and Politics in Minnesota. She is a regular guest on TPT’s Almanac.   She’s a former Russian linguist for the US Air Force and the National Security Agency, where she was awarded the Joint Service Commendation Medal for her contributions to the intelligence community. Amy was elected to the Minnesota State Senate in 2005 and served until 2013. She became the first woman ever elected in Minnesota as Senate Majority Leader in 2011. She has been a business owner for close to twenty years in her hometown of Buffalo,Minnesota. Amy is the mother of Rachel Koch, a student at Clemson University.
 
Brian R. McDaniel is a Republican and a Chicago Cubs fan. Needless to say, he is familiar with disappointment. Brian is an attorney and Minnesota governmental relations professional working with Franzen Moore Governmental Relations in Saint Paul with over 15 years experience working both inside and outside of the Minnesota State Capitol. Prior to joining Franzen Moore, Brian served as the Director of Government Relations for the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, Legislative Director to the Speaker of the House, Director of Fiscal Policy for the Minnesota Business Partnership and Committee Administrator for the House Committee on Commerce, Jobs & Economic Development.Additionally, McDaniel spent 5 years as an appointed member of the Metropolitan Council, was elected by his peers to serve on the Board of the Minnesota Governmental Relations Council, has been published in Hennepin Lawyer magazine, and makes frequent television appearances as a political analyst. Brian holds a J.D. from William Mitchell College of Law (cum laude) as well as a B.A. in Political Science from Minnesota State University (magna cum laude).
 
Javier Morillo-Alicea is the president of Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 26, which unites close to 6,000 property service workers in the Twin Cities metro area. As president, he leads the organizing, legislative and political activities of the local union representing Minnesota’s union janitors and private security guards. He is also recognized in Minnesota as a political strategist and appears regularly on local political talk shows as a progressive commentator. Since Morillo was elected president, SEIU Local 26 has grown by roughly 1,200 members, including over 700 private security officers in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Local 26 is focused on negotiating member contracts, uniting new members, and developing new leaders. In the past five years, as a result of three public contract campaigns, Local 26 won affordable healthcare for janitors and security officers, along with dramatic wage increases. In addition, the local has participated in national campaigns, including traveling to Houston in 2006 to support 5,000 newly united janitors. In Houston, Morillo was arrested with SEIU members and leaders and spent 37 hours in jail after engaging in an act of civil disobedience; although the mounted Houston police met the protest with violence it ultimately led to a first janitorial contract in Houston.
Wednesday, March 11, 2020 - 16:00